Photo by Nathan Denette at the Canadian Press.

Photo by Nathan Denette at the Canadian Press.

Purveyors of pot work to shake off the ‘Reefer Madness’ stigma

You won't find brightly coloured bongs or bubble gum-flavoured rolling papers displayed against the backdrop of exposed brick and modern, industrial-style furnishings at Tokyo Smoke.

Instead, the shop — located in a former shipping dock nestled between two warehouses in Toronto's west end — carries high-end pot paraphernalia befitting the pages of a design magazine while also serving up cups of artisanal coffee.

Pipes handcrafted by California-based ceramicist Ben Medansky sit alongside a pricey portable vaporizer, a reimagined version of the French press coffeemaker launched via a Kickstarter campaign and a selection of what shop owner Alan Gertner calls "museum quality collectibles" — items such as vintage Barbies and a vintage Hermes bag.

It's all part of Gertner's mission to create a cannabis-friendly lifestyle brand that caters to the urban intellectual — one that breaks the mould of dated weed associations involving video games and junk food.

"I don't think there is a home for someone who's buying Mast Brothers chocolate and drinking the nicest coffee to have a similar experience in pot," says Gertner, who quit his job at Google to launch the brand.

"It's no different from someone who has beautiful stemware in their home for alcohol. We ritualize and love our experiences, and I think we should have the same thing with cannabis."

The emergence of a luxury cannabis-oriented lifestyle brand like Tokyo Smoke is the latest development in a saga that has seen the purveyors of pot work to reshape popular perceptions of the drug.

Read more

Published by the Canadian Press.